News
Filter:
Show Hide
Ex: author name, topic, etc.
Ex: author name, topic, etc.
By Topic
Show Hide
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
By Region
Show Hide
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
  • Expanded
By Type
Show Hide
By date
Show Hide

Michelle Mello and colleagues argue that state legal reforms have exacerbated rather than improved weaknesses in U.S. emergency powers revealed by COVID-19, jeopardizing future responses.

In her testimony before the U.S. Senate Finance Committee, Mello emphasized the need for federal guardrails and standards regarding the use of artificial intelligence in health care.

Research led by SHP’s Michelle Mello provides some clarity regarding liability over AI technologies that are rapidly being introduced to health care. She and her co-author analyzed more than 800 tort cases involving both AI and conventional software in health care and non-health-care contexts to see how decisions related to AI and liability might play out in the courts.

In this School of Medicine Scope blog post, SHP’s Sara Singer notes that as technology encourages 24-7 digital connectivity, there's a coinciding rise in unhealthy behaviors: poor sleep, poor nutrition, lack of exercise, less outdoor time and social isolation.

Research by Eran Bendavid and colleagues reveals a steady increase in the number of people at risk from tropical cyclones and the number of days per year these potentially catastrophic storms threaten health and livelihoods. The findings could help relief agencies, development banks, and other organizations plan more effective strategies for mitigating extreme weather impacts.

A new study finds that the Protecting Life in Global Health Assistance policy, formerly known as the Mexico City Policy, reduced the provision and use of contraceptives, as well as community health volunteer services, in African countries.

SHP's Michelle Mello and Stanford Medicine colleagues write in the journal JAMA that President Biden's recent executive order on Artificial Intelligence could have significant implications for health-care organizations.

Health policy professors Stacie B. Dusetzina and Alyce Adams discuss the policies that can prevent cancer patients from having to choose between health and bankruptcy in this Stanford Health Policy Forum.

In this JAMA Network Viewpoint, Stanford Health Policy's Kevin Schulman and Perry Nielsen Jr. look at the impact Large Language Models could have on our complex health-care billing system.

The prize awarded by the American Economic Association is in memory of Elaine Bennett, who made significant contributions in economic theory and experimental economics and encouraged the work of young women in all areas of economics.

Many states allow nurse practitioners to independently prescribe drugs, a growing practice that critics argue can adversely affect quality of care. A Stanford-led study now indicates that NPs do just fine when prescribing medicine for seniors.

News

Meet Natalia Serna, PhD, an assistant professor of health policy and our newest core faculty member at Stanford Health Policy. The health economist focuses on the impact government policies and insurance markets can have on health outcomes and costs.

Eran Bendavid and his Stanford colleagues examine how often Californians visit emergency departments (ED) and found that, surprisingly, people tend to avoid the hospital on the smokiest days.

An estimated 1 million people are held in conditions of modern slavery in Brazil today. Members of the Stanford Human Trafficking Data Lab travel to Brazil to investigate possible trafficking sites while working alongside their Brazilian counterparts to expand an AI database designed to help authorities find illegal camps faster and more effectively.

Fuchs’ influence and tireless devotion to the field of health care economics and the Stanford community spanned decades.

Three Stanford students spend their summer in Brazil with Stanford faculty and researchers, all of whom are members of the Stanford Human Trafficking Data Lab.

The Supreme Court decision concerning Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 raises new questions about the ability of private employers—including health-care organizations—to enforce vaccination requirements for employees who have religious objections. In this JAMA Health Forum commentary, Michelle Mello and colleagues consider the implications.

AI algorithms often are trained on adult data, which can skew results when evaluating children. A new perspective piece by SHP's Sherri Rose and several Stanford Medicine colleagues lays out an approach for pediatric populations.

The inaugural Stanford Biodesign Policy Fellows and their Program Director Kavita Patel meet with Doug Owens, chair of the Department of Health Policy, to learn about the department’s faculty, courses, and expertise in decision science, health economics and data modeling. The Biodesign Policy Fellowship seeks to develop the next generation of health policy leaders capable of leveraging transformative new technologies to materially impact patient outcomes while democratizing access to care.

SHP's Adrienne Sabety and Bay Area experts in homelessness have launched an innovative experiment to determine whether giving unhoused people unconditional cash payments will improve their housing insecurity.

Meet Stanford Health Policy's Fernando Alarid-Escudero, a decision scientist who develops statistical and decision-analytic models to identify optimal prevention, control, and treatment policies to address a wide range of public health problems.

Alyce Adams, an expert in health equity and policy explains how new approaches in communities and health systems are improving care delivery for traditionally underserved populations.

Stanford Health Policy Undergraduate Research Fellows are spending their summer alongside faculty, investigating compelling and complex health policy issues.

New research shows that starting cholesterol lowering treatment with a low- to moderate-intensity statin was associated with a greater reduction of LDL levels among older patients than with younger ones.