Beth Duff-Brown at Stanford Health Policy

Beth Duff-Brown

  • Communications Manager

Stanford Health Policy
615 Crothers Way, Room 176
Stanford, CA 94305

650-736-6064 (voice)
Media Calls: 650-391-3135 (mobile)

Biography

Beth Duff-Brown became the Communications Manager at Stanford Health Policy in May 2015. She was the editorial director at the Center for International Security and Cooperation for three years before joining the health policy and research centers at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the School of Medicine. Before coming to Stanford, Beth worked in Africa and Asia as a foreign correspondent for The Associated Press, including as bureau chief for South Asia, based in New Delhi, and as the Deputy Asia Editor at the Asia-Pacific Desk in Bangkok, overseeing the daily news report from Afghanistan to Australia. She was a 2010-2011 Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford, where she developed a digital platform to tell stories about women and girls in the developing world. Beth has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University and was a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

In The News

Getty Images Illustration of COVID-Law
News

US Court Rulings Constrain Public Health Powers During COVID-19 Pandemic

cover link US Court Rulings Constrain Public Health Powers During COVID-19 Pandemic
Grant Miller announces 2024 Rosenkranz Prize Winner Natalia Serna
News

Rosenkranz Prize Winner Investigates Impact of Price Controls on Contraceptives

This year's Rosenkranz Prize winner is Natalia Serna, PhD, a health economist investigating how women's health is impacted by price controls on oral contraceptives.
cover link Rosenkranz Prize Winner Investigates Impact of Price Controls on Contraceptives
A woman looking at pill box
News

What Happens When Patients Lose Their Long-Term Opioid Treatment?

This new study by SHP's Adrienne Sabety examines the association between prescriber workforce exit, long-term opioid treatment discontinuation, and clinical outcomes.
cover link What Happens When Patients Lose Their Long-Term Opioid Treatment?