Stacie Vilendrer

Stacie Vilendrer, MD, MBA

Stanford/Intermountain Fellow, PCPH

Twitter: @StacieVilendrer

Research Interests

Physician behavior change, social determinants of health, population health, health policy

Bio

Stacie grew up in Minnesota where she decided to become a physician after watching her grandfather survive metastatic cancer with the support of his medical team. She honored in Human Biology at Stanford, where her senior thesis investigated community beliefs around childhood malaria in rural Tanzania. She continued to pursue global health work with nonprofits in India and Tanzania prior to medical school that sought to scale the capacity of health worker training programs.
 
Stacie returned to Stanford School of Medicine to complete her medical degree where she focused on cost-effectiveness research for a genetic screening tool. Recognizing the increasing importance of market dynamics in healthcare delivery, Stacie also chose to pursue her MBA at the Graduate School of Business where she gained additional experience in the private sector with Medtronic and McKinsey & Company. Stacie completed her medical training at UCSF-affiliate Santa Rosa Family Medicine and is a practicing board-certified family physician. She is currently pursuing the Stanford-Intermountain Fellowship in Population Health Sciences. 
 
Stacie’s current research seeks to bring rigorous methodologies to answer those questions most relevant to the hospital C-suite: How to effectively manage physicians and other healthcare workers? How to achieve the quadruple aim of improving patient outcomes, lowering cost, and improving the physician and patient experience? How to transition from a fee-for-service to a value-based health system? Her work is based in implementation science, using quantitative and qualitative methodologies to answer the above questions. Her ongoing projects relate to physician incentives, physician burnout, policy impacts on population health, corporate benefit management strategies, medical assistant turnover, and social determinants of health.