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Journal Articles

JAMA Forum: Resuscitating Abortion Rights in Emergency Care

Michelle Mello
JAMA Network, 2022 September 8, 2022

In this JAMA Forum article by Stanford Health Policy's Michelle Mello, the professor of health policy and law writes that reports are mounting of pregnant patients being denied potentially lifesaving care in emergency departments.

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Journal Articles

Effectiveness of vaccination mandates in improving uptake of COVID-19 vaccines in the USA

Michelle Mello
The Lancet, 2022 July 8, 2022

Illustration of COVID-19 vaccines
Unsplash/Jeremy Bezanger
Many high-income countries have rapidly pivoted from hard decisions about who may receive COVID-19 vaccines, due to shortages, to equally hard decisions about who must receive them. As lasting containment of COVID-19 remains elusive, many nations—from Costa Rica, to Austria, to Turkmenistan—are turning to vaccination mandates of various kinds. Mandates, however, are controversial in many countries. Austria's proposed mandate for adults, for example, provoked mass protests. Some objectors argue mandates represent undue encroachment on individual liberty. Some other objectors maintain that mandates will not be an effective policy for COVID-19 because many individuals will seek to evade them, and mandates might erode support for other public health measures such as mask wearing.

In this Viewpoint we consider the likely effectiveness of policies that require COVID-19 vaccines in improving vaccine uptake and reducing disease in the USA, in view of the evidence from past vaccination mandates and distinctive aspects of COVID-19. Two dimensions of effectiveness in improving uptake are relevant: (1) target-group effectiveness (the extent to which a mandate improves uptake of vaccines in the group covered by the policy) and (2) population effectiveness (the extent to which mandate policies improve vaccination coverage in the US population).

Full Viewpoint

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Commentary

Owning Guns Puts People in Your Home at Greater Risk of Being Killed, New Study Shows

David Studdert
2022 June 3, 2022

Photo of Gun
Unsplash/Steve Woods

Millions of Americans may have asked themselves these questions, or versions of them—especially in the wake of horrific mass shootings like those in Buffalo and Uvalde. Record-breaking spikes in gun sales over the last two years, alongside surveys indicating that self-protection continues to be the dominant reason for buying guns, underscore a widely-held belief that a gun in the home has security benefits.

new study from my research team, recently published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, shows no such benefits. We found the opposite: people living in homes with guns face substantially higher risks of being fatally assaulted.

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Journal Articles

Educational Gradients in Disability Among Asia’s Future Elderly: Projections for the Republic of Korea and Singapore

Cynthia Chen, Karen Eggleston, Jue Tao Lim, Ngee Choon Chia, Daejung Kim, Haemi Park, Lijia Wang, Bryan Tysinger, Daejung Kim, Ngee Choon Chia, Haemi Park, Lijia Wang, Bryan Tysinger, Michelle Zhao, Alex R. Cook, Ming Zhe Chong, Jian-Min Yuan, Stefan Ma, Kelvin Bryan Tan, Tze Pin Ng, Koh Woon-Puay, Joanne Yoong, Jay Bhattacharya
Asia Development Review, 2022 April 1, 2022
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Journal Articles

Democracies Linked To Greater Universal Health Coverage Compared With Autocracies, Even In An Economic Recession

Tara Templin, Joseph L. Dieleman , Simon Wigley, John Everett Mumford, Molly Miller-Petrie, Samantha Kiernan, Thomas J. Bollyky
Health Affairs, 2021 August 1, 2021
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Journal Articles

COVID-19 in the California State Prison System: an Observational Study of Decarceration, Ongoing Risks, and Risk Factors

Elizabeth T. Chin, Tess Ryckman, Lea Prince, David Leidner, Fernando Alarid-Escudero, Jason R. Andrews, Joshua Salomon, David Studdert, Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert
Journal of General Internal Medicine , 2021 July 21, 2021
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Commentary

Legal Look at Proof of Vaccination & Ongoing Fight Against COVID-19

David Studdert, Michelle Mello
2021 July 21, 2021

Stanford health law experts Michelle Mello and David Studdert discuss the ongoing pandemic, proof of vaccination “passports” at the state and federal levels, and a July 19 ruling that Indiana University could require that its students be vaccinated.

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Working Papers

Compliance with Price Transparency by California Hospitals

Bianca Mulaney, Shreya A. Shah, Christine Kim, Shreya A. Shah, Christine Kim, Laurence C. Baker
2021 July 10, 2021

An examination of how California hospitals are adhering to the federal policy on price transparency.

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Journal Articles

Incorporating Health Equity Into COVID-19 Reopening Plans: Policy Experimentation in California

Emily A. Largent , Govind Persad, Michelle Mello, Danielle M. Wenner, Daniel B. Kramer , Brownsyne Tucker Edmonds, Monica Peek
American Public Health Association, 2021 June 10, 2021
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Commentary

Contact-tracing App Curbed the Spread of COVID in England and Wales

C. Jason Wang
Nature, 2021 May 25, 2021

Digital contact tracing has the potential to limit the spread of COVID-19. A contact-tracing smartphone app that has been readily adopted by people in England and Wales has shown efficacy in reducing disease spread.

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Journal Articles

Impact of Treatment Duration on Mortality Among Veterans with Opioid Use Disorder in The United States Veterans Health Administration

Jack Ching, Douglas K. Owens, Jodie A. Trafton , Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, Joshua Salomon
Wiley Online Library, 2021 May 17, 2021
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Journal Articles

Ethical Machine Learning in Healthcare

Irene Y. Chen, Emma Pierson, Sherri Rose, Shalmali Joshi, Kadija Ferryman , Marzyeh Gassemi
2021 May 6, 2021
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Working Papers

Risk Perceptions and Protective Behaviors: Evidence from COVID-19 Pandemic

M. Kate Bundorf, Jill DeMatteis , Grant Miller, Maria Polyakova, Jailu L. Streeter , Jonathan Wivagg
Nation Bureau of Economic Research, 2021 April 1, 2021
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Journal Articles

Choices In a Crisis - Individual Preferences Among SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines

Daniel B. Kremer, Douglas J. Opel, Efthimios Parasidis , Michelle Mello
The New England Journal of Medicine , 2021 March 3, 2021

Now that a third COVID-19 vaccine has been given emergency-use authorization, Michelle Mello and colleagues ask whether individuals should be able to choose which vaccine they receive.

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Journal Articles

Influence and Information in Team Decisions: Evidence from Medical Residency

David Chan
American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, 2021 February 1, 2021

I study team decisions among physician trainees. Exploiting a discontinuity in team roles across trainee tenure, I find evidence that teams alter decision-making, concentrating influence in the hands of senior trainees. I also demonstrate little convergence in variation of trainee effects despite intensive training. This general pattern of trainee effects on team decision-making exists in all types of decisions and settings that I examine. In analyses evaluating mechanisms behind this pattern, I find support for the idea that significant experiential learning occurs during training and that teams place more weight on judgments of senior trainees in order to aggregate information.

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Journal Articles

Lancet Series on Women’s and Children’s Health in Conflict Settings

Paul H. Wise, Eran Bendavid, Stephen J. Stedman
2021 January 24, 2021

A new four-paper series in The Lancet exposes the far-reaching effects of modern warfare on women’s and children’s health.

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Journal Articles

Short-term and Long-term Educational Outcomes of Infants Born Moderately and Late Preterm

Carrie Townley Flores , Amy Gerstein, Ciaran S. Phibbs, Lee M. Sanders
2021 January 5, 2021
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Journal Articles

Alternative Dose Allocation Strategies to Increase Benefits From Constrained COVID-19 Vaccine Supply

Ashleigh R. Tuite, Lin Zhu, David N. Fisman, Joshua Salomon
Annals of Internal Medicine , 2021 January 5, 2021
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Working Papers

Trauma at School: The Impacts of Shootings on Students' Human Capital and Economic Outcomes

Marika Cabral , Bokyung Kim , Maya Rossin-Slater, Molly Schnell, Hannes Schwandt
2020 December 31, 2020
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Working Papers

Trauma at School: The Impacts of Shootings on Students' Human Capital and Economic Outcomes

Marika Cabral , Bokyung Kim , Maya Rossin-Slater, Molly Schnell, Hannes Schwandt
2020 December 31, 2020
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Commentary

Far More Transparency is Needed for COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

Jennifer E. Miller , Joseph S. Ross, Michelle Mello
STAT News, 2020 November 5, 2020

With vaccines against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, on the near-term horizon, U.S. policymakers are focusing on how to ensure that Americans get vaccinated. This challenge has been compounded by reports that White House officials are exerting undue influence over the agencies that would ordinarily lead such efforts, the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Journal Articles

School Reopenings and the Community During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, David Studdert, Michelle Mello
JAMA Network, 2020 October 28, 2020

Few issues in the policy response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have inspired as impassioned debate as school reopening. There is broad agreement that school closures involve heavy burdens on students, parents, and the economy, with profound equity implications, but also that the risk of outbreaks cannot be eliminated even in a partial reopening scenario with in-school precautions. Consensus largely ends there, however: the approaches states and localities have taken to integrating these concerns into school reopening plans are highly variable.

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