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Maya Rossin-Slater
Journal Articles

Relationship between season of birth, temperature exposure, and later life wellbeing

Adam Isen, Maya Rossin-Slater, Reed Walker
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , 2017

We study how exposure to extreme temperatures in early periods of child development is related to adult economic outcomes measured 30 y later. Our analysis uses administrative earnings records for over 12 million individuals born in the United States between 1969 and 1977, linked to fine-scale, daily weather data and location and date of birth.

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Working Papers

Family Ruptures, Stress, and the Mental Health of the Next Generation

Maya Rossin-Slater, Maya Rossin-Slater, Petra Persson
American Economic Review , 2017

This paper studies how in utero exposure to maternal stress from family ruptures affects later mental health. We find that prenatal exposure to the death of a maternal relative increases take-up of ADHD medications during childhood and anti-anxiety and depression medications in adulthood. Further, family ruptures during pregnancy depress birth outcomes and raise the risk of perinatal complications necessitating hospitalization. Our results suggest large welfare gains from preventing fetal stress from family ruptures and possibly from economically induced stressors such as unemployment.

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Journal Articles

Every Breath You Take — Every Dollar You’ll Make: The Long-Term Consequences of the Clean Air Act of 1970

Adam Isen, Maya Rossin-Slater, W. Reed Walker
Journal of Political Economy , 2017

This paper examines the long-term impacts of early childhood exposure to air pollution on adult outcomes using U.S. administrative data. We exploit changes in air pollution driven by the 1970 Clean Air Act to analyze the difference in outcomes between cohorts born in counties before and after large improvements in air pollution relative to those same cohorts born in counties that had no improvements. We find a significant relationship between pollution exposure in the year of birth and later life outcomes.

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Journal Articles

Signing Up New Fathers: Do Paternity Establishment Initiatives Increase Marriage, Parental Investment, and Child Well-Being?

Maya Rossin-Slater
America Economic Journal: Applied Economics , 2017

With nearly half of U.S. births occurring out of wedlock, understanding how parents navigate their relationship options is important. This paper examines the consequences of a large exogenous change to parental relationship contract options on parental behavior and child well-being. Identification comes from the staggered timing of state reforms that substantially lowered the cost of legal paternity establishment. I show that the resulting increases in paternity establishment are partially driven by reductions in parental marriage.

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Journal Articles

WIC in Your Neighborhood: New Evidence on the Impacts of Geographic Access to Clinics

Maya Rossin-Slater
Journal of Public Economics , 2013

A large body of evidence indicates that conditions in-utero and health at birth matter for individuals’ long-run outcomes, suggesting potential value in programs aimed at pregnant women and young children. This paper uses a novel identification strategy and data from birth and administrative records over 2005-2009 to provide causal estimates of the effects of geographic access to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).

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Journal Articles

The Effects of California's Paid Family Leave Program on Mothers' Leave-Taking and Subsequent Labor Market Outcomes

Maya Rossin-Slater, Christopher Ruhm, Jane Waldfogel
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management , 2013

This analysis uses March Current Population Survey data from 1999-2010 and a differences-in-differences approach to examine how California’s first in the nation paid family leave (PFL) program affected leave-taking by mothers following childbirth, as well as subsequent labor market outcomes. We obtain robust evidence that the California program doubled the overall use of maternity leave, increasing it from an average of three to six weeks for new mothers – with some evidence of particularly large growth for less advantaged groups.

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