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Donald A. Barr
Journal Articles

Bending the Medicare Cost Curve for Physicians’ Services: Lessons Learned from Canada

Donald Barr
Journal of General Internal Medicine, 2012 December 31, 2012
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Abstracts

The California Challenge: Ensuring Primary Care Access for Medi-Cal Recipients Under the Affordable Care Act

Donald Barr
California Journal of Politics and Policy, 2011 December 31, 2011
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Journal Articles

Research Protocol to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Public-Private Partnerships as a Means to Improve Health and Welfare Systems Worldwide, A

Donald A. Barr
American Journal of Public Health, 2007 January 1, 2007

Public-private partnerships have become a common approach to health care problems worldwide. Many public-private partnerships were created during the late 1990s, but most were focused on specific diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria.

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Journal Articles

Healthcare in the New Vietnam: Comparing patients' satisfaction with outpatient care in a traditional neighborhood clinic and a new, western-style clinic in Ho Chi Minh City

Sonny Tat, Donald Barr
Social Science & Medicine, 2006 March 1, 2006

As Vietnam opens its economy to privatization, its system of healthcare will face a series of crucial tests. Vietnam's system of private healthcare -- once comprised only of individual physicians holding clinic hours in their homes -- has come to also include larger customer-oriented clinics based on an American business model. As the two models compete in the expanding private market, it becomes increasingly important to understand patients' perceptions of the alternative models of care.

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Journal Articles

The practitioner's dilemma: can we use a patient's race to predict genetics, ancestry, and the expected outcomes of treatment?

Donald Barr
Annals of Internal Medicine, 2005 December 6, 2005

Recent research has identified genetic traits that can be used in a laboratory setting to distinguish among global population groups. In some genetic analyses, the population groups identified resemble groups that are historically categorized as "races." On the basis of these associations, some researchers have argued that a patient's race can be used to predict underlying genetic traits and from these traits, the expected outcomes of treatment.

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Journal Articles

Listening to Patients: Cultural and Linguistic Barriers to Health Care Access

Donald A. Barr, SF Wanat
Family Medicine, 2005 March 1, 2005

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Full access to medical care includes cultural and linguistic access as well as financial access. We sought to identify cultural and linguistic characteristics of low-income, ethnic minority patients' recent encounters with health care organizations that impede, and those that increase, health care access.

METHODS:

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Journal Articles

Race/Ethnicity and Patient Satisfaction: Using the Appropriate Method to Test for Perceived Differences in Care

Donald A. Barr
Journal of General Internal Medicine, 2004 September 1, 2004

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether an established patient satisfaction scale commonly used in the primary care setting is sufficiently sensitive to identify racial/ethnic differences in satisfaction that may exist; to compare a composite indicator of overall patient satisfaction with a 4-item satisfaction scale that measures only the quality of the direct physician-patient interaction.

DESIGN: Real-time survey of patients during a primary care office visit.

SETTING: Private medical offices in a generally affluent area of northern California.

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Journal Articles

Time to Listen (commentary), A

Donald A. Barr
Annals of Internal Medicine, 2004 January 20, 2004

When teaching my students about what goes into a good doctor-patient interaction, I tell them about the studies that show how quickly doctors interrupt their patients. Male physicians especially, I tell them, are notorious for stopping the patient mid-sentence to redirect the discussion. In one study that I came across, female primary care physicians waited an average of 3 minutes before interrupting the patient to redirect the discussion toward issues more relevant to diagnosis. Male physicians waited an average of 47 seconds.

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Journal Articles

Problems in Using Patient Satisfaction Data to Assess the Quality of Care Provided by Primary Care Physicians

Donald A Barr, P Vergun, SR Barley
Journal of Clinical Outcomes Management, 2000 September 1, 2000
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