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Tess Ryckman

Tess Ryckman, BA

Pre-doctoral Student at Stanford Health Policy
Encina Hall, Room C233-E
616 Serra Street
Stanford, CA 94305-6019

Research Interests

Allocation of scarce resources for health; simulation and evaluation of health policies; cost-effectiveness analysis of health and nutrition programs, interventions, and delivery packages; donor-domestic cost-sharing arrangements; use of data and modeling for health policy decision-making; sustainable health financing; measuring burden of disease, especially for under-nutrition; innovative financing mechanisms; the economic impact of disease burden

Bio

Tess Ryckman is a first year Health Policy PhD student concentrating on decision sciences. During her time at Stanford, she hopes to focus on questions related to the allocation of scarce resources in low- and middle-income settings, using cost-effectiveness analysis and modeling tools. She is particularly interested in infectious diseases and malnutrition, but also hopes to explore topics that are becoming more and more important in the field of global health but which sometimes receive less focus, such as non-communicable disease and road traffic accidents. Tess comes to Stanford from four years at the Results for Development Institute (R4D), where she was a Program Officer. At R4D, Tess worked on projects with major multilateral and bilateral donors and country governments (in South Africa, India, and Papua New Guinea) on HIV, immunization, malaria, and nutrition financing, resource allocation, and policy analysis. Before joining R4D, Tess received her Bachelor of Arts i n Economics from Yale University.Allocation of scarce resources for health; simulation and evaluation of health policies; cost-effectiveness analysis of health and nutrition programs, interventions, and delivery packages; donor-domestic cost-sharing arrangements; use of data and modeling for health policy decision-making; sustainable health financing; measuring burden of disease, especially for under-nutrition; innovative financing mechanisms; the economic impact of disease burden