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Marijuana edible products need stronger regulation, Stanford experts say

News / March 11, 2015

States that have legalized marijuana need to put strong restrictions on the drug's edible products, according to two Stanford law professors.

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U.S. Push for Abstinence in Africa Is Seen as Failure Against H.I.V.

News / February 26, 2015
Eran Bendavid and Nathan Lo's research finds that abstinence and fidelity programs did not significantly change sexual behavior in Africa and thus did not help to prevent AIDS.
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Tsetse fly: can castration end one of Africa’s oldest development problems?

News / February 19, 2015
Tsetse fly castration may reduce sickness in animals and help increase animal-based farming in Africa. The Guardian interviews Dr. Marcella Alsan regarding her research on the tsetse fly's relationship to African agriculture.
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In developing countries, child-mortality rates fell most among poorest families, study finds

News / November 9, 2014
The study provides evidence that a country’s ability to reduce the gap in child-mortality rates is related to good governance.
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Pregnant women with PTSD more likely to give birth prematurely, study finds

News / November 6, 2014
Pregnant women with a recent diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder were 35 percent more likely to deliver a premature baby than were other pregnant women, a study of more than 16,000 births found.
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Former ambassador, political scientist McFaul to lead FSI

News / November 5, 2014

Michael McFaul, a Stanford political scientist and former U.S. ambassador to Russia, has been selected as the next director of the university’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

The announcement was made Wednesday by Stanford Provost John Etchemendy and Ann Arvin, the university’s vice provost and dean of research. McFaul will succeed Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar, who was nominated in July as an associate justice of the California Supreme Court and elected Tuesday.

McFaul takes the helm of FSI in January.

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For inmates, pricey hepatitis C drug could make financial sense

News / October 20, 2014

Despite its $7,000-per-week cost, sofosbuvir provides better value than other current treatments for prisoners with hepatitis C, according to Stanford researchers.

New, significantly improved hepatitis C drugs have revolutionized how the disease is treated, but they are also expensive. One such drug, sofosbuvir, costs more than $7,000 a week for 12 weeks of treatment.

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Rebuilding trust key to fighting Ebola in Africa

News / September 24, 2014
The Ebola epidemic, which could affect hundreds of thousands of West Africans, can only be contained by rebuilding public trust and local health systems decimated by years of neglect, according to a panel convened by the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Stanford Medicine. FSI Senior Fellows David Relman, Paul Wise, Stephen Stedman and Douglas Owens were among the panelists.
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In Ebola Crisis, Hope and Heroism

Commentary / September 2, 2014

Traditional drug repurposing, although successful in treating some diseases, still requires considerable time to identify candidate compounds and even more time to test them in clinical trials. Ebola requires and deserves a much more aggressive approach, while still balancing safety and efficacy concerns.

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Paul Wise on "Airtalk" with Larry Mantle

Q&A / August 28, 2014

Paul Wise discusses the effects of the Affordable Care Act on children's health care.

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Why the massive black market trade in cigarettes affects you even if you don't smoke

News / June 25, 2014
A National Academy of Sciences committee meets this week to study a large, growing and little-understood black market in drugs. But rather than cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine, the committee members will be discussing tobacco cigarettes. The global black market in tobacco is estimated to supply 11.6% of the world’s consumption, a startling 650 billion cigarettes a year. And there are two components to this market that have drawn the particular scrutiny of law enforcement: fake cigarettes and tax avoidance.
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Stanford Global Development and Poverty initiative awards $4.6 million for research aimed at alleviating poverty

News / June 18, 2014
Fourteen Stanford researchers addressing global poverty through a range of academic disciplines are receiving the money from the university-wide Global Development and Poverty initiative. The initiative is part of the Stanford Institute for Innovation in Developing Economies and is administered in partnership with Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.
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Casper awarded for service to American Law Institute

News / June 11, 2014
The American Law Institute's distinguished service award was presented to Gerhard Casper by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Casper, Stanford's ninth president and a senior fellow at FSI, was recognized by his longtime friend as a “prominent and uncommonly successful leader in the academic world.”
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You're Never Too Old to Be Studied

Commentary / May 22, 2014
When older patients seek health care, they are unwittingly enrolling in an experiment: Will medical procedures that have been proved effective mainly on the young also help the elderly?
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Early vaccination could save lives, dollars in next flu pandemic, Stanford researchers show

News / May 20, 2014
Beginning vaccinations at four, rather than six, months after a pandemic flu outbreak would save thousands more lives and millions of dollars in a large metropolitan area, a new study shows.
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George W. Bush shares presidential insights with Stanford students

News / May 6, 2014
In remarks that were often blunt and sometimes funny, George W. Bush spoke with Stanford students about some of the defining moments of his presidency. The conversation ranged from congressional power to his take on world leaders and the impact his policies had on curbing the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Africa.
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Health care aid for developing countries boosts life expectancy, study finds

News / April 22, 2014
Health care aid is directly linked to an increase in life expectancy and a decrease in child mortality in developing countries, according to a new study by CHP/PCOR researchers.
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Growth in Drug Treatment Has Led to More Innovation

Commentary / March 17, 2014
Insurance coverage for addiction treatment has been expanded more in the past five months than in the preceding five decades. Contrary to the common complaint that nothing is changing in the “war on drugs”, the U.S. has never been closer to providing universal addiction treatment on demand.
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Stanford researchers launch new approach to health policy in India

News / March 17, 2014
Grant Miller and Nomita Divi are spearheading the Stanford India Health Policy Initiative, a program that rethinks health care in India. The initiative’s focus comes from the people who regularly confront problems with the country's health care services and strives to understand why patients and providers don’t always make seemingly logical decisions.
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At Stanford, IMF chief discusses promise, risk of global economy

News / February 25, 2014
Christine Lagarde says she is optimistic that the world’s economic leaders are committed to taking the steps that will guard against another large-scale financial collapse. But she’s worried that unless more sustainable jobs are created, economic disparities will increase.
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CHP/PCOR’s three new faculty members bring a varied background in behavioral health economics, law and children’s health outcomes

News / December 16, 2013
Three researchers, whose work spans the globe as well as disciplines, have joined CHP/PCOR. They include a health law professor, a physician economist interested in how behavioral issues influence patient outcomes, and another physician economist who will focus on health economic issues among children in developing countries.
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Stanford researchers: Feds likely miscalculated health care costs

News / September 11, 2013
With millions of Americans eligible for subsidies to buy health insurance, Stanford Health Policy's Jay Bhattacharya shows the government may have underestimated its costs by billions of dollars.
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Members of the media should contact Stanford Health Policy Communications Manager Beth Duff-Brown

bethduff@stanford.edu

650-736-6064