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Alyce Adams, Stanford Health Policy
Q&As
Q&As

The passion Alyce Adams, PhD, has for improving health outcomes for people in marginalized communities was inspired by the suffering she witnessed of chronically ill elderly relatives in California, Oklahoma and Arkansas. In this Q&A with Stanford Medicine Chief Strategy Officer and Senior Associate Dean Priya Singh, Adams — professor of health policy — talks about the devastating impact that chronic conditions like diabetes had on my own family members.

A recently released report from an expert committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine — including Stanford Law School and Department of Health Policy professor Michelle Mello and former Rosenkranz Prize winner Ami Bhatt — focuses on how wastewater monitoring has become a critical tool in the fight against infectious diseases.

A new paper by Michelle Mello and colleagues at Stanford and Yale outlines the "fair inclusion score," which ranks pharmaceutical companies on their inclusion of racial and ethnic minoritized groups, women, and the elderly in clinical trials.

As public control of U.S. hospitals has declined dramatically, Mark Duggan — director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research — shows how privatization improves profitability but reduces access for the most vulnerable patients.

In this cross-sectional study of nearly 800,000 U.S. participants aged 5 to 17 years with family income under 200% of the federal poverty threshold, researchers found that higher family income was significantly associated with a lower prevalence of diagnosed infections, mental health disorders, injury, asthma, anemia, and substance use disorders and lower 10-year mortality.

A rare three-way exchange of liver transplants in Pakistan was made possible with a new algorithm developed by Stanford Health Policy PhD student Alex Chan. The transaction was one of the world’s first documented three-way liver exchanges and the first to use a new liver exchange algorithm that finds optimal matches from a pool of candidates.

Health economist Maria Polyakova conducts detailed analysis of the first-year impact of the COVID-19 pandemic among people based on their race and ethnicity, employment and education.

Adrienne Sabety is an assistant professor at Stanford Health Policy. Her work includes a large, 14-month study in collaboration with the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene in New York City targeting barriers to accessing health care for uninsured, undocumented immigrants. The Center for Innovation in Global Heath spoke with her about this work, and how undocumented immigrants—and society more broadly—benefit when access to primary, preventive care is expanded.

Research by Petra Persson and Maya Rossin-Slater on health inequality finds wealthy Black mothers and infants fare worse than the poorest white mothers and infants.

Statin-associated muscle symptoms are common and may lead to discontinuation of indicated statin therapy. So cardiologist Mark Hlatky and colleagues conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial of vitamin D supplementation.

New research shows that older men who live alone are at greater risk of managing chronic conditions and medications —a social conundrum that could lead to higher levels of cardiovascular disease.

A new article co-authored by Health Policy PhD candidate Vincent Jappah reveals that the modern drivers of child servitude in Liberia are largely social vulnerability and cultural acceptance of the practice, rather than traditional factors based on race and ethnicity.

In this National Bureau of Economic Research working paper, Stanford Health Policy's David Chan and Yiqun Chen consider the productivity of emergency room physicians vs. nurse practitioners.

The NIH is funding a Stanford Medicine-led study, "Sexual harassment Training Of Principal investigators," or STOP. Through virtual, multimodal trainings that incorporate interactive gaming elements, the goal of the five-year study is to decrease sexual harassment and improve the retention of women in science.
SHP Director Douglas Owens is one of the collaborators and notes, "It's crucially important that we create inclusive, welcoming environments, especially for people training in T32 programs."

A new study by PhD student Melissa Franco finds that screening for depression via patient portals offers hope for wider detection.

Research using data from residents and staff in the California prison systems show that vaccinations offer good protection against infection with Omicron, even among patients who had previous infections.

David Studdert, a professor of health policy and professor of law, writes in this New England Journal of Medicine commentary that while clinicians face the specter of medical malpractice lawsuits, the number of paid claims against physicians has actually decreased by 75% in the past 20 years and looks at the the medical malpractice system and its impact on medical decision making.

The School of Medicine's AHEaD program provides training and experience in population health research for college students who are from underrepresented and historically excluded groups in the health sciences. This summer's co-director Sherri Rose, an associate professor of health policy, says the program is intended to empower students from underrepresented populations.

The Center for Innovation in Global Health speaks with Bendavid about which populations are most vulnerable to malnutrition and food insecurity driven by poverty, climate change, and natural disasters — as well as the increasing role that conflicts and politics play in access to food.

The five year, $5.5 million award will be used by Rose — an associate professor of health policy — to develop a framework to investigate the social impacts of algorithms on health care.

Michelle Mello — a professor of heath policy and law — attended the Sept. 13 gathering at the White House to celebrate the passing of the Inflation Reduction Act 2022. She was invited for her contributions on Medicare price negotiation modeling for the landmark piece of legislation. In this Q&A, she discusses the bill's impact on health policy.

When private equity buys nursing homes, death rates go up by 10 percent. Yasmin Rafiei halted her studies at Stanford School of Medicine to investigate.

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs awards Keith Humphreys top honors for his research on treatments for substance use and psychiatric disorders.

In this Q&A with Stephanie Ashe at Stanford Law, SHP's Michelle Mello — a professor of health policy and a professor of law — examines the guidance for health-care providers recently issued by the Biden Administration.

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